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Welcome to Animated Knots by Grog

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Grog's Rope Splicing

Instructions: Move the mouse over each knot. Look at the description to find out what it can be used for. Click on the knot you wish to see. On the new page wait until the selected knot starts to tie itself.

Pictures of Common Rope Splices
Common Rope Splices

Common Rope Splices

Welcome to the Splicing Section

Advantages of Splicing

A Splice is usually significantly stronger than a knot and is intended to be permanent. Undoing a splice and re-making it takes much more time than doing the same with most knots.

Strength

Careful tapering of the strands, or of the buried end, preserves strength; it ensures a gradual transition of the fiber-alignment in the strands of the standing end. With tapering, a breaking strain approaching 100% of the rope's rated strength is possible - especially with the Brummel and Long Bury techniques.

Exception

The Sliding Splice is the exception. We created it to make a Sailor's Rope Belt – for which it is well suited – and was never intended to take a critical load. Some workers installing electricity cables, however, have reported using the same splice to haul cables through buried pipes.

Appropriate Splicing Techniques

Modern, strong, high modulus fibers are often slippery and cannot be secured with customarily trustworthy knots and splices. These fibers encouraged the development of the loosely woven, hollow braid ropes in which the fiber-alignment maximized strength. These ropes require suitable splicing techniques such as the Brummel and Long Bury. The ropes yield excellent strength from the fibers, and the splices weaken the ropes hardly at all.

Make a selection from the images above or go to the Options Page.

Disclaimer: Any activity that involves ropes is potentially hazardous. Lives may be at risk - possibly your own. Considerable attention and effort have been made to ensure that these descriptions are accurate. However, many critical factors cannot be controlled, including: the choice of materials; the age, size, and condition of ropes; and the accuracy with which these descriptions have been followed. No responsibility is accepted for incidents arising from the use of this material.

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Version 7.0
May 21, 2017