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Animated Knots by Grog

TIE KNOTS THE FUN AND EASY WAY

Better to know a knot and not need it, than need a knot and not know it.

Sheet Bend

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Alpine Butterfly Loop Back Splice Barrel Hitch Bowline Cleat Hitch (Halyard) Clove Hitch (Half Hitches) Coil Unattached Rope Constrictor (Twisting) Double Fisherman's Double O'hand Stopper Eye Splice Figure 8 Half Hitch Lashing, Square Lashing, Diagonal Lashing, Round Lashing, Shear Lashing, Tripod Marlinspike Hitch Midshipman's Hitch Rolling Hitch Round Turn & Hitches Sailmaker's Whipping Sheet Bend Sheepshank Square (Reef) Timber Hitch Trucker's Hitch Whipping (Common)

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Sheet Bend Tying

Form a bight in the thicker rope (blue) and hold it in one hand. Pass the thinner rope (red) through the bight and behind the (blue) tail and standing ends in that order. Finally, tuck the smaller rope under itself to finish the knot.

Sheet Bend Details

Uses: The Sheet Bend (ABOK # 1431, p 262) is recommended for joining two ropes of unequal size. The thicker rope must be used for the simple bight as shown. It works equally well if the ropes are of the same size.

Becket Hitch: The Becket Hitch is a very similar knot. However, it is a "Hitch": it does not join two ropes, it attaches a rope to a Becket (a rope handle or an eye). In the animation the Blue Rope would be Becket and the Red Rope would be tied to it with a Becket Hitch.

Tying it: The Sheet Bend would replace the Square (Reef) knot except for the awkward fact that it is not a binding knot – it has to be tied with both ends loose in your hands with no load on the ropes (The Square Knot - with all its faults - can be tied tight against a sail, or parcel, and usually stays tight while the second Half Hitch is tied).

Double Sheet Bend
Double Sheet Bend

Double Sheet Bend

Double Sheet Bend: When the ropes are markedly different in size, the tail of the smaller rope can be taken twice round the bight in the larger rope to create the double sheet bend.

Structure: When correctly tied the two tails lie on the same side of the knot. The alternative version - with the tails on opposite sides - is less reliable.

Knots for Net Making
Knots for Net Making

Knots for Net Making

Knots for Making a Net: Making a Cargo Net is tedious, time-consuming, and only to be undertaken out of necessity or by the enthusiast.

The image on the left shows the two knots that are most commonly used at each junction when making a net. The Carrick Bend has been used in the upper row and the Sheet Bend has been used in the lower row.

Climbing Net Tying
Climbing Net Tying

Climbing Net Tying

Suggested Scheme for Making a Climbing Net: In case you ignore this excellent advice, and proceed to make your own net, the image on the right shows a method using the the Carrick Bend.

  • Size: In practice many more vertical ropes will be used to make it wider, and it will be longer as well. In this picture, colored rope has been used to make it easier to follow the path.
  • Verticals: Six verticals have been used. In practice, half the number of ropes will be used, each twice as long, as though neighboring pairs had been joined at the top.
  • Rope Length Needed: It is worth making a test with a short length of rope to determine how much rope is consumed making each square. The two side ropes consume less because they do not pass around any squares.
  • Top Ropes: At the top, each loop of rope can be left long - to hang down from a pole, or left short so that each alternate square has a double top border.
  • Side Ropes: Here each side shows that alternate squares have twin ropes - lying beside each other. It is preferable to twist them around each other in a spiral before starting the knots in the next row. This same treatment can be applied to the double rope at the top.
  • Bottom Ropes: The bottom ropes are shown left hanging. In practice, each one can be tied to its neighbor to make a neat bottom row. As with the top and sides, the ends can spiral around the bottom line before being tied together.

Disclaimer: Any activity that involves ropes is potentially hazardous. Lives may be at risk - possibly your own. Considerable attention and effort have been made to ensure that these descriptions are accurate. However, many critical factors cannot be controlled, including: the choice of materials; the age, size, and condition of ropes; and the accuracy with which these descriptions have been followed. No responsibility is accepted for incidents arising from the use of this material.

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Updated August 18, 2014

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