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Animated Knots by Grog

TIE KNOTS THE FUN AND EASY WAY

Better to know a knot and not need it, than need a knot and not know it.

Crown Sinnet Knot

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Crown Sinnet Knot Tying

Bind the four ends together. Turn the ends towards you. Tie a crown knot and tighten. Reverse direction, tie another crown knot and tighten. Keep repeating.

Crown Sinnet Knot Details

Uses: The Crown Sinnet (ABOK # 2912 and # 2915, p 479) is tied by many of us as children. It converts lengths of string or colored plastic into a pleasingly solid braid. Such braids become fashionable from time to time as decorative bracelets for wrist and ankle, or as straps for umbrellas, etc. The names employed depend on the craft. In particular the name "Square Knot" is used for different knots in different places. Sinnet is also spelled Sennet, Sennit, and Synet.

Lanyard Making Names: The making of lanyards goes by various names including: craftlace, scoubidou, boondoggle, and gimp. The Crown Sinnet is probably the knot most frequently chosen. The version using alternating left turn and right turn crowns is called either a "Square Knot" or a "Box Knot". The version that repeats the same crown makes a spiral, known as a "Barrel". Military lanyards usually use two stranded crown knots tied around a two-stranded core. The result is known a "Cobra" when the crowns alternate and a "Twisted Cobra" when same crown is repeated.

Macrame Names: Unfortunately macrame uses totally different names. The two versions of the Cobra are known as a Square Knot and a Spiral Stitch.

Structure: The sinnet is composed of a series of Crown Knots. It is usually made with either three or four stands - although more are possible.

Starting the Sinnet: For this demonstration, four colors, and therefore four cords, were used. A four stranded Crown Sinnet is often started using only two pieces of cord. The sinnet can then be started by laying the two cords across each other at their centers – the simplest way of making one end of the sinnet secure and neat.

Finishing the Sinnet: The other end is completed by tying the cords to a ring or by securing the ends either by melting them or by Whipping them.

Disclaimer: Any activity that involves ropes is potentially hazardous. Lives may be at risk - possibly your own. Considerable attention and effort have been made to ensure that these descriptions are accurate. However, many critical factors cannot be controlled, including: the choice of materials; the age, size, and condition of ropes; and the accuracy with which these descriptions have been followed. No responsibility is accepted for incidents arising from the use of this material.

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Updated March 8, 2014

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